Some thoughts on tight corners in medical and health care education

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DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17267/2594-7907ijeh.2022.e4783

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References

(1) Foot P. Virtues and vices and other essays in Moral philosophy. Oxford: Oxford University Press; 2002.

(2) MacIntyre A. After virtue: a study in moral theory. South Bend: University of Notre Dame; 2022.

(3) Woods A. The limits of narrative: Provocations for the medical humanities. Medical Humanities. 2011;37(2):73–8. http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2011-010045

(4) Strawson G. Against narrativity. Ratio. 2004;17(4):428–52.

(5) Bronken BA, Kirkevold M, Martinsen R, Kvigne K. The aphasic storyteller: Coconstructing stories to promote psychosocial well-being after stroke. Qualitative Health Research. 2012;22(10):1303–1316. https://doi.org/10.1177/1049732312450366

(6) Hinckley JJ. Telling the story of stroke when it’s hard to talk. Topics in Language Disorders. 2015;35(3):258–26. https://doi.org/10.1097/TLD.0000000000000066

(7) Ulatowska HK, Reyes B, Santos TO, Garst D, Vernon J, McArthur J. Personal narratives in aphasia: Understanding narrative competence. Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation. 2013;20(1):36–43. https://doi.org/10.1310/tsr2001-36

(8) MacIntyre A. Ethics in the Conflicts of Modernity - An Essay on Desire, Practical Reasoning, and Narrative. Cambridge: Cambridge UP; 2016.

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Published

2022-10-19

How to Cite

Monteiro, J. (2022). Some thoughts on tight corners in medical and health care education. International Journal of Education and Health, 6, e4783. https://doi.org/10.17267/2594-7907ijeh.2022.e4783

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Editorial